Top Tip: Removing Egg Shells from Mixtures

Top Tip: Removing Egg Shells from Mixtures

 

How many times have you cracked an egg and some of the shell ends up in your bowl?  You end up spending countless minutes trying to fish it out, before you give up and just pretend its not there (or is that just me? :))

Solution: Use one of the larger egg shells to scoop it out.  Fail Proof!  No more chasing a small piece of shell around and around the bowl or biting into something unexpectedly crunchy around the dining room table 🙂 

Egg Shell 

Top Tip: Boiling Vegetables

Top Tip: Boiling Vegetables

I’m sure you boil vegetables a few times a week but did you know …

Boiling Root Vegetables: 

When boiling any kind of root vegetable such as potatoes, carrots, butternut, parsnips, turnips etc – always submerge your vegetables in cold (tap) salted water and then bring to the boil. This allows the heat to penetrate and cook your vegetables evenly, resulting in a smoother, creamier end result!

Boiling Green Vegetables:

Green vegetables such as broccoli, spinach, cabbage, peas etc – should be cooked quickly – Plunging them into large quantities of salted boiling water keeps cooking time to a minimum and allows the vegetables to retain their colour, texture and taste.  Green vegetables must always be boiled uncovered – allowing volatile acids to escape which could otherwise effect their colour, texture and taste

Recipe Yields

Recipe Yields

 

A recipe yield indicates the number of portions one will achieve when following a recipe…

Example: Yields 4 – This means you will feed 4 people if you follow this recipe.

I’m sure you have had many a situation where your recipe only caters for 4 but you want to cook for more OR, your recipe caters for 10 but you only want to cook for 2 … and probably like me, you spend ages trying to work out the new measurements and end up confusing yourself to the point of no return!   Well, you can put that all behind you and take on any recipe with confidence, by using this very simple formula that I learnt in culinary school –

New Yield / Old Yield x Old Measurement

In other words – New Yield = the number of people you want to feed with this recipe.  Old Yield = the number of people this recipe currently feeds. Old measurement = the ingredient measurement per item as listed on the recipe.

Example –

Spaghetti Recipe 

Yield 4 

Ingredients:

Pasta 50grms

Mince 500grms

Tomato Puree – 30ml

Chopped up tinned tomatoes – 250grms

Onion 1

Beef stock – 500ml

You have the above recipe but you are having 10 people over for dinner – therefore;

10 divide by 4 = 2.5 (new yield divided by old yield = 2.5)

Pasta 50grms x 2.5 = 125grms

Mince 500grms x 2.5 = 1,250 kgs

Tomato Puree – 30ml x 2.5 = 75ml

Chopped up tinned tomatoes – 250grms x 2.5 = 625grms

Onion 1 x 2.5 = 2.5 onions

Beef stock – 500ml x 2.5 = 1,250 litres

Note: If you want to reduce the yield of a recipe – apply the same formula –

Example –

Spaghetti Recipe

Yield 4

 Ingredients:

Pasta 50grms

Mince 500grms

Tomato Puree – 30ml

Chopped up tinned tomatoes – 250grms

Onion 1

Beef stock – 500ml

You have the above recipe but you just want to make enough for just yourself – therefore;

1 divide by 4 = 0.25 (new yield divided by old yield = 0.25)

Pasta 50grms x 0.25 = 12.5grms

Mince 500grms x 0.25 = 125grms

Tomato Puree – 30ml x 0.25 = 7.5ml

Chopped up tinned tomatoes – 250grms x 0.25 = 62.5grms

Onion 1 x 0.25 = quarter onion

Beef stock – 500ml x 0.25 = 125ml