Gammon with a Maple Syrup, Honey & Mustard Glaze

Gammon with a Maple Syrup, Honey & Mustard Glaze

Nothing says Christmas in South Africa, quite like Gammon, does it?  It’s one of those meals thats reserved solely for Christmas.   If I had Gammon at another time during the year, I’d feel as if I was cheating on Christmas … I’m sure some of you know what I mean.  So, with it being the Festive Season, I decided to make a little Gammon for Andrew, Hudson, My Mom and I for dinner on the 23rd December … an opening act, to the main Gammon coming on Christmas day, if you will.  If we can only indulge in Gammon at Christmas, then lets at least enjoy two 🙂 

The result? A resounding YUM!!! Even Hudson enjoyed it and I didn’t think he would eat meat just on its own like that, but he loved it.  The best part is it was so easy to prepare, almost had me thinking, I could make this a few times a year… just kidding Christmas! 

I used a deboned and non smoked gammon but you could use smoked too – will add to the flavour. 

Ingredients: 

2kg boneless gammon 

3 carrots, peeled and roughly chopped

2 celery sticks, roughly chopped

1 onion, peeled and roughly chopped

2 Tbsp Black Pepper Corns

Maple, Honey & Mustard Glaze: 

80ml maple syrup

80 ml honey

2 Tbsp Dijon mustard

100g demerara sugar

Whole Cloves (A lot)

 

Method:

Place the onion, carrots, celery and gammon in a large pot and cover with cold water.  Bring to the boil, turn down the heat and simmer for approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes.   Allow gammon to cool slightly before removing from pot and setting aside.  If cooking a day in advance, once your gammon and cooking liquid have cooled down, you can return the gammon to the pot with the cooking liquid in it and refrigerate until the next day.  Just remember to take your gammon out of the fridge 30 – 45 minutes prior to moving on to the next step. 

Preheat your oven to 180 degrees.

Make your glaze by mixing all ingredients together until the sugar dissolves.  Remove the rind from your boiled gammon by gently running your fingers between the rind and the fat.  You should be able to pull it off in one piece, leaving behind a thin even layer of fat.  Score the fat in a criss-cross diamond pattern, taking care not to cut into the meat.  Stud the centre of each diamond with a clove.  Generously coat the gammon with half the glaze, using a pastry brush to spread evenly.  Roast for 15 minutes before removing from the oven and brushing over the remaining glaze.  Return to the oven and roast for another  20 – 30 minutes, until the gammon is a rich golden brown colour, taking it out occasionally and basting with the pan juices.  Remove from the heat and allow to rest for 15 minutes before serving. 

I served mine with Mustard Mash, Honey Glazed Baby Carrots & Asparagus and it paired perfectly! Let’s just say there was no space left for dessert 🙂

 

 

 

Turn out sauces like a chef with this little secret weapon …

Turn out sauces like a chef with this little secret weapon …

I LOVE a good sauce … for me a meal is not a meal without sauce !  My food to sauce ratio is usually half and half (*blush*).  This could be why I am constantly fighting the bulge … but its worth the fight because food without sauce would be like a mojito without the mint – a total let down!

In a commercial kitchen, the chef responsible for making all sauces is known as the “Saucier”.  The Saucier is often the highest respected Chef in the kitchen, reporting directly to the Head or Sous Chef.  Creating delicious sauces with depth of flavour is no easy task and one I am still aspiring towards myself.  I do have my moments in the kitchen, where I make a sauce so delicious that I literally break out into dance and skip to Andrew, spoon in hand and make him taste it, heck, I’d make Mango & Oliver taste it too, if I could catch them.  Andrew struggles to understand my excitement and has even gone so far as to say “It’s just a sauce!”… Stopping me in my tracks, mid Pirouette …”Just a sauce????” :-O 

So imagine my delight when visiting the Mothership months ago (yes, I wasn’t going to share this secret weapon originally, but ’tis the season’ & all that, so think of this as my Christmas present to you) and I spotted this little beauty on the shelf.

For the foodies out there, you’ll know that a Demi-Glace sauce is a thick, rich brown sauce that can be used on its own or as a delicious base for other sauces.  Making your own Demi-Glace could take days on the stove top.  This is in my opinion, liquid gold!

You can add it to your gravies, other sauces, stews and soups to enrich the flavour and take it to restaurant quality.    I’ve followed the suggestions on the box for a mushroom sauce … OMW, best mushroom sauce ever!!! 

Inside the box is 8 little sachets of liquid gold- which is perfect, because you only need a little dash at a time.  I always ensure that my pantry is stocked with at least 3 boxes … just incase. 

So there you go, now you have a secret weapon for your Christmas Gravy this year.

Your’e Welcome 🙂

 

New Baby Potato Salad with Mustard Dressing

New Baby Potato Salad with Mustard Dressing

Photography by Darren Bester

Yield: 10, as a side dish 

Ingredients:

x2 700g Bags of Baby Potatoes, boiled, skinned & cut into quarters 

10 – 12 Quail Eggs, hard boiled & seasoned with salt and pepper

Caper Berries, some chopped up and some retaining original appearance  

Red Onions, finely Chopped 

2 Handfuls Chopped Chives

2 tbsp Dijon Wholegrain Mustard 

2 tbsp Dijon Traditional Mustard

2 tbsp Honey 

90ml Lemon Juice 

250ml Olive Oil 

Salt & Black Pepper 

Micro Herbs for Garnishing 

Method: 

In a measuring jug whisk the mustards, honey, lemon juice, olive oil, salt & pepper until well combined and adjust seasoning to taste.  Place the potato quarters, red onions, chives and capers in a large bowl and pour over the dressing, retaining a little for later.  Stir well to combine, taste and season with salt & pepper.  Carefully spoon the salad onto your serving platter.  Arrange the quail eggs on the salad and lightly drizzle with the remaining dressing.  Sprinkle over a few micro herbs for garnish & serve.

Cooks Notes: This salad is lovely served warm or chilled 

Martha Who Potato Salad 6

Recipe Yields

Recipe Yields

 

A recipe yield indicates the number of portions one will achieve when following a recipe…

Example: Yields 4 – This means you will feed 4 people if you follow this recipe.

I’m sure you have had many a situation where your recipe only caters for 4 but you want to cook for more OR, your recipe caters for 10 but you only want to cook for 2 … and probably like me, you spend ages trying to work out the new measurements and end up confusing yourself to the point of no return!   Well, you can put that all behind you and take on any recipe with confidence, by using this very simple formula that I learnt in culinary school –

New Yield / Old Yield x Old Measurement

In other words – New Yield = the number of people you want to feed with this recipe.  Old Yield = the number of people this recipe currently feeds. Old measurement = the ingredient measurement per item as listed on the recipe.

Example –

Spaghetti Recipe 

Yield 4 

Ingredients:

Pasta 50grms

Mince 500grms

Tomato Puree – 30ml

Chopped up tinned tomatoes – 250grms

Onion 1

Beef stock – 500ml

You have the above recipe but you are having 10 people over for dinner – therefore;

10 divide by 4 = 2.5 (new yield divided by old yield = 2.5)

Pasta 50grms x 2.5 = 125grms

Mince 500grms x 2.5 = 1,250 kgs

Tomato Puree – 30ml x 2.5 = 75ml

Chopped up tinned tomatoes – 250grms x 2.5 = 625grms

Onion 1 x 2.5 = 2.5 onions

Beef stock – 500ml x 2.5 = 1,250 litres

Note: If you want to reduce the yield of a recipe – apply the same formula –

Example –

Spaghetti Recipe

Yield 4

 Ingredients:

Pasta 50grms

Mince 500grms

Tomato Puree – 30ml

Chopped up tinned tomatoes – 250grms

Onion 1

Beef stock – 500ml

You have the above recipe but you just want to make enough for just yourself – therefore;

1 divide by 4 = 0.25 (new yield divided by old yield = 0.25)

Pasta 50grms x 0.25 = 12.5grms

Mince 500grms x 0.25 = 125grms

Tomato Puree – 30ml x 0.25 = 7.5ml

Chopped up tinned tomatoes – 250grms x 0.25 = 62.5grms

Onion 1 x 0.25 = quarter onion

Beef stock – 500ml x 0.25 = 125ml